attitudinal,  behavioral,  testing

User Tasks

There are a variety of ways to administer and receive information from performing a user task experiment. Essentially, by using user stories and user flows to inform your task selection, you can observe how easily that task is to perform and if there are any obstacles along the way. This method is a successful way to learn of stuck-points and find areas for improvement. There are different varieties of user task testing but all share a similar premise.

 

 

 

Time Based

For a time based task, record the amount of time it takes a user to complete a task. This provides good quantitative data to make comparisons after improvements are made as the measurements can be shows to increase or decrease.

Observational

Observational testing involves the researcher observing the user complete the tasks. This method is excellent because a researcher can not only gather information about their own observations, but also the thoughts, opinions and spoken thought process of the user.

Survey Based

Following a user task test, if not in person, a survey is given to the user to get their responses about their experience. The questions inquire about steps of the process, opinions and suggestions, and stuck-points.